Capping Station - Waste Station - Epson
The capping station is an articulated sponge pad that moves in conjunction with printhead position. When the printhead is commanded to the specific position the capping station and pad will rise and cap the bottom of the head softening inks there and protecting from dried inks.

Charge Cycle
Separated into different events of; initial charge cycle: The event that occurs during initial setup of the printer. InkJetCarts recommends following the printer manufacturers "Start Here" card that accompanies the printer and packaging in ALL CASES. Manufacturers cartridges should be used for intialization "first time setup" of ALL printers. standard charge cycle: A charge cycle should in no way be confused with a printhead cleaning / clearing procedure. In most cases a charge cycle cannot and should NOT be stopped. It occurs after an ink change procedure where the printer senses a new cartridge is installed after an empty condition. The charge cycle does NOT consume much ink.

Color Charts
A series of charts that when printed properly can be used across the many different printers you own OR may own in the future. The chart colors are generic and not icc specific in color (see ICC). These charts can assist in the final stages of priming the head by actual printing and with MORE PRECISE CONTROL than printhead cleanings and are highly recommended for all refillers and refilling of printers.

Error Epson- "X unrecognized" Single position
A condition whereby the printer previously exhibited a "low ink" message on that same cartridge position. You may or may not have seen that message due to your individual settings of the Epson software. Enable "low ink" messages from within the Epson software to get an advanced warning that a position is coming due on a reset, usually within a page of the next print. This condition exists because of Epson copyrighted software. Our chips do NOT report true ink levels and DO NOT violate Epson patents nor copyrights, hence when the printer senses an out of ink condition it will stop printing and display the "X-unrecognized" cartridge error. You should perform the reset procedure for the chip type you have to clear this error.

Error- Epson- "X unrecognized" All positions
A condition whereby the printer cannot read ALL cartridge positions. You may or may not have the chip(s) seated properly or you may be in a condition noted as "firmware lockout" due to your timing of a simultaneous installation of our system chip(s) at same timing interval of an existing "out of ink" condition. You should check; 1) was your printer "out of ink" on a position prior to installation? See AfterCare document AfterCare.pdf and perform firmware lockout procedure. 2) chip installation for correct install, and ready to print settings of chip. 3) correct chip number for correct model of printer.

ICC ICM
ICC stands for International color consortium. ICM stands for International Color Management and is used by printer, monitor graphics cards, gaming, and color managemernt professionals worldwide. Of the original 8 member companies that worked together to create the ICC standards only 4 still are heavily active managers. The ICC and the ICM baseline standards in terms of color management are the guiding alogarithims that DRIVE COLOR OUTPUT as it is seen and printed. Without an "ICC standard" all prints would look different from device to device. WITH AN ICC STANDARD EMBEDDED in your files you can take an image from printer to printer and from machine to machine and it will print exactly the same everywhere you take it. ICC’s and ICM’s are very important part of color management and taking a little time to understand them is the first step in understanding color management.

Ink
The printer solution for permanent display. Inks can be of many types to include pigment, photo dye, solvent, eco-solvent, dye sublimation, gel, acid, ultraviolet, textile and direct to garment. Other types exist.

Ink Bay
See also "Printhead". Simply stated, where you install your ink cartridges is the ink bay. This can be an area directly above the printhead or separate area where the cartridges are mounted into the printer.

Ink Cartridge
The delivery system of inks into the printer. See also "Ink Bay". Many different types exist. From a combined ink carridge/printhead to separate ink cartridges to multicolored/combined ink cartridges.

Ink Eco Solvent Pigment
Most Pigment Solvent inks today are ECO SOLVENTS whereby the pigment is the same and are ground very finely and then suspended inside a NEW MORE FRIENDLY SOLVENT liquid in order to create an ink, with less smell / odors. The pigment creates a lightfast material or ink that is more resistant to fading. Pigment based inks being made today may be over one hundred years lightfast. However, the lightfastness is determined by various factors such as the paper type, the storage conditions, and the place producing the ink. Do NOT confuse eco-solvents as being harmless, they are still chemicals designed to etch their way into the media and become permanent. Care should be taken with ALL solvents. InkJetCarts has long ago replaced all solvents with Eco-solvent inks.

Ink Photo Dye
Dye inks are water soluable carriers of dyes. These inks generally have a greater color gamut than pigment inks but there longevity can vary greatly due to environmental effects. There are variants like acid or AUV/ anti-uv / dye sublimation and other types of dye inks. All have their pros and cons but for the most part dye inks are shorter lived than their pigment ink cousin.

Ink Pigment
Pigment inks are pigments of color that are ground vey finely and then suspended inside a liquid in order to create an ink. The pigment creates a lightfast material or ink that is more resistant to fading. Pigment based inks being made today may be over one hundred years lightfast. However, the lightfastness is determined by various factors such as the paper type, the storage conditions, and the place producing the ink.

Ink Solvent Pigment
Pigment Solvent inks are pigments of color that are ground vey finely and then suspended inside the solvent liquid in order to create an ink. The pigment creates a lightfast material or ink that is more resistant to fading. Pigment based inks being made today may be over one hundred years lightfast. However, the lightfastness is determined by various factors such as the paper type, the storage conditions, and the place producing the ink. The solvents in the inks are very good at embedding themselves into certain medias from PVC and vinyls to other media as well. Pigment Solvent images will by far out-survive ALL other forms of imprinting for true outdoor work. Anything else is a temporary print. Most solvent Media and Solvent ink manufacturers will put a limit of 3 to 5 years guarantee or warranty on the products, but we have seen outdoor signs and vehicle wraps lasting well into 10 years or more and still looking good. Yes some fading was present but the images still looked acceptably well.

Nozzle Check - Epson
An Epson term whereby a squiggly line pattern is printed to inspect each individual nozzle of the printhead for testing & output purposes.

Priming Charts
See Also "Color Charts". Colored pages of single and multi-colored charts used in the refilling operations to ensure sustainable and reliable color channel output from one OR more simultaneous channels.

Printhead
The Printer’s device that actually expels the inks onto the media. Many different types exist but the main types employed are Piezo Electric by Epson / Thermal Eelctric by HP and Thermal Bubble Jet by Canon. These manufacturers professional lines of head DO DIFFER from their desktop models.

Printhead Cleaning Cycle
A manufacturers "maintenance" procedure whereby the printhead is cleaned by an extended firing of inks as well as a combination of wiping and parking the head on a series of pads within the printer. Usually there are different "steps" (lengths of time the head fires inks) of each head cleaning routine. In other words within most printers there are a short, medium and a long cycle. These different "steps" cannot be altered or chosen by the user except in the case of certain professional lines of printers. Most believe that the different steps will run upon successive cleaning cycles in a row, but this is just not true. During testing we have found multiple short cycles run successively. The programming within the printer controls which cycles will run and you have no definitive control over which one "will in fact run".

Test Chart Pattern - Canon
A Canon term for inspecting the output of the printer by a series of small color bars that exhibit to a large part printer printhead health and flow conditions. It is critical to ensure sustainable ink flow in a Canon Head as this head type is a thermal and a no flow condition can burn the head.

Test Page - HP
An HP term in the maintenance setup menus that exhibits a full page print of different color blocks and text imagery. Defects in this print are detected by you and subsequent action should be taken to ensure full flow of inks from the printhead(s). Printhead damage can occur if continued printing on a no flow condition from the head(s).

Waste Pad Sponges - Epson
The waste pad sponges are buried beneath your printer frame. At one point in time they were accessible and could be cleaned/dried. Many late model printers it is better to find the tube and expel the inks overboard.

Waste Sponge Tubing Epson
Leading from the capping station to the printer internal bulk ink waste sponges is a tube supply. Most times one tube, sometimes two tubes. The tube(s) feed inks from the capping station to the bulk ink waste sponges.